Buyer & Problem Solving Keywords – Use Them & Skyrocket Your Affiliate Sales

Admit it: You’re here because you want more money. Don’t be shy. Just say it. It’s okay. It doesn’t matter if you’re running an affiliate site, a website for your restaurant, or you’re an SEO who is trying to rank a client’s site;

You’re here because you want to improve your search results to either make more sales, get more customers, or rank clients in order to demand more money from your next one.

​It’s okay.

​Lots of people love money. Most people need money.

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​Getting people to buy products that you promote, order food at your restaurant, or to hire you again and again is what it’s all about. One of the ways to get more sales is to get more traffic to your affiliate links. Many of us do this by raising in SERPS by using clean, PBN domains with authority. But what happens when that traffic gets to your affiliate site? Are you using the right keywords to get the sale?

​This post will mostly focus on affiliate marketing on money sites but with a little insight and reflection it’s possible for all sorts of online marketers to get some good info.

​Keyword Research Should START with Buying Keywords for Affiliates

​Using buyer keywords is one of the most underestimated and underused methods of keyword research. Why, when a person is out to being an affiliate site, would they not initially target buyer keywords is beyond me. If you can get this one simple step down and done right, then you’ve already got half the power you need to a profitable website…as long as you’re promoting the right thing.

​Here are a few of my favorite buyer keywords. (I know that we’re jumping right into it here, but there’s more below and I need this information laid out up front.)

​I break down my buyer keywords into 2 categories: Product Buying Keywords and Problem Solving Buying Keywords

​Product Buying Keywords: These are the keywords and keyword phrases that people type into a search engine when they’ve already decided to buy but are looking or either the best deals or the best product in their desired category of purchase. Basically, the people who search for these kinds of phrases are already in the final stage of purchasing or buying…they are just looking for someone (your content!) to point them in the right direction.

​Examples:

  • Best (product)
  • (product) Reviews
  • (Product) Deals
  • Discount (product)
  • Bargain (product)
  • How to Buy a (product)
  • (Product 1 and Product 2) Comparison
  • Cheap (product)
  • Affordable (product)
  • Durable (product)
  • High end (product)

Problem Solving Buying Keywords: These keywords are looked for in SERPs when, obviously, people are trying to find a solution to a problem. It is my experience that these keywords don’t convert as well as the Product Buying Keywords but they do make sales. Keep in mind that with this kind of keyword a person is looking for a cure, solution, coping mechanism, etc. and they may not necessarily be at the same stage as the buyers in Product Buying Keywords category an possibly just be in a research phase.

​Examples:

  • How to Get rid of (problem)
  • How to Cure (problem)
  • How to Cope with (problem)
  • How to Deal with (problem)
  • Learn (problem)
  • Improve (problem)

Times When Problem Solving Keywords Outperform Product Buying Keywords

​I feel more comfortable working with the Product Buying Keywords because I just try to get as many people as I can to click an affiliate link and then let a landing page or product page sell the product. However, many people in this final phase can become stagnant with product comparison and “pulling the trigger” on a purchase. The decision to buy has been made but the action of doing so becomes crippling. I think most of us know someone like this.

​However, on the other side of the lane the Problem Solving Keyword may actually buy quicker than a person who is already in the buying phase. Why? Because when a person needs a problem solved and you’ve provided a gateway (affiliate link) to their solution they’re most apt to be relieved and make an impulse purchase because they are convinced their problem has been solved. Of course, we want to make sure that the products we are promoting do in fact solve their problem to limit returns and unhappy customers.

​Why do Both Categories of Keywords Actually Work?

​People make buying decisions based upon emotion and feeling just as much as they do based upon logical thinking and facts.

​The two sides of the brain pretty well sum it up: Left Side usually means analytical, logical, studious while the Right Side brings intuition and being subjective. But that doesn’t mean that one of the brain is turned on while the other shuts down. Not at all. Some people may consider themselves a “Left Brained” person or a “Right Brained” person, but that doesn’t matter. There’s no way to shut it down and both sides of our personality have an impact on what we do and think.

​Playing Both Sides of the Fence

​So, no matter what phase of buying a person is in, you can take advantage of their emotional (“I really need this problem solved or I’m going to go crazy”) and their analytical (“I’m going to need new running shoes soon. Let me see which ones are best”)

​How can you take advantage of both of these buyers? By incorporating the analytical and emotional within the same content.

​Most product reviews we see have a few things in common: Introduction, Features, Pros vs. Cons, and a Final Analysis (the review’s or reviewer’s recommendation). But why don’t we take a little more time and add a “Problems Solved with this Product” section.

​You may think that it’s self-explanatory and just by reading the benefits section a person will be able to figure that out but psychologically if a person is thinking “how do I solved this problem” and a piece of content says, straight out “This product solves this problem” then you’ve just appeased a buyer and given them an answer to their problems.

​And let’s not forget that besides selling, this type of section within content could have a large impact on SEO results as well. Once you putting “Problems Solved with (product)” headings and then listing each problem and a short explanation then you can imagine the type of long-tail and LSI keyword benefits that you might get from that.

​Putting it all Together for Good Use

​Let’s say that you run/own an Amazon affiliate review site. Your niche is Crockpots and you’ve been targeting the Product Buying Keywords “best crockpots”, “best slow cookers” etc.

​Your typical, single product review might look this:

Intro: 100 to 200 words introducing the product and getting attention of the reader.

Features of (Product): 200 words of specific features of this product such as auto-shut off, light weight, anti-burn…etc

Specs: 100 words Size, volume, weight, power required, etc.

Pros/Cons: 100 It has this, but doesn’t do this type of stuff. Remember to NOT talk a buyer out of a product. Simple list pros and list cons. (I always list one less con 😉

Final Analysis: 50 to 100 words of “we feel that this product is great” or “our final rating is 8/10 stars” something like that….

​Sometimes, you’ll also see a sub-heading for benefits. But that doesn’t mean crap to buyers. “Benefits” is something that you get from a workers comp. It’s not a buying keyword! Why don’t we label it, instead, and inject it right under the pros/cons and before the final analysis. Why? Because you just listed “Cons” and kind of left it on a negative note. So, before your “Final Analysis” and a Call to Action…put your reader in a frame of mind of “this answers all of my questions and addresses all of my problems….

​Our New Review Would Look Like This:

Intro: 100 to 200 words introducing the product and getting attention of the reader.

​Features of (Product): 200 words of specific features of this product such as auto-shut off, light weight, anti-burn…etc

Specs: 100 words Size, volume, weight, power required, etc.

​Pros/Cons: 100 It has this, but doesn’t do this type of stuff. Remember to NOT talk a buyer out of a product. Simple list pros and list cons. (I always list one less con 😉

​Problems Solved with (Product): Here you can add a great deal of content that plays on the wants, needs and desires of your reader. “No more late nights cooking dinner because you can actually start dinner at breakfast time”. “This crockpot comes with 100 easy, recipes so that you’re not pulling your hair out every day trying to decide ‘what’s for supper’, etc

​Final Analysis: 50 to 100 words of “we feel that this product is great” or “our final rating is 8/10 stars” something like that….

​Summary:

​Buying keywords are great. Problem solving keywords are good, too. Combine them both in your content and you’ll be able to make more sales by targeting what your readers really need and are there for. There’s more than 1 way to skin a goat…

7 Comments

  1. Moving North September 18, 2016
    • Steve Rendell September 19, 2016
    • Still Moving North September 19, 2016
  2. Gary Niarhos October 7, 2016
  3. David March 21, 2017
    • Steve Rendell March 27, 2017
  4. Emmerey Rose June 27, 2017

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